Initial D.A. – Isaac and Ryan’s Post-Regionals Reports

February 14th, 2016 | Posted by Isaac Lam in Team Reports

Breaking from the traditional style of team reports, this piece is a combined effort from Singapore Regionals runner-up Ryan Chiam, and myself, winner of Singapore’s inaugural VGC’16 Premier Challenge. Ryan and I piloted teams which, in essence, functioned identically to each other in our best performances so far, revolving around the same core combining Mega Rayquaza and a Primal-centric Trick Room mode. While our performances at Regionals ultimately differed more than I would have liked, I think our experiences navigating a harsh, titan-infested metagame in its infancy will give everyone something to take home about the controversial ’16 format.

Part I: PC #1

My first team had a lot less thought behind it than you might expect, literally being pieced together at McDonald’s over brunch just before the PC. Prior to the event, I had been experimenting with all kinds of stranger Pokémon choices, including, but not limited to Rocky Helmet Xerneas, Cobalion and a Tailwind team built to support a Palkia sweep. I had been logging all the teams I faced on Showdown, though, which provided me valuable information on the format’s trends and gave me a rough idea of what would and wouldn’t work.

Trick Room switch has always been a strong choice for me, offering the perfect mix of versatility and brainless autopilot outs which I think is essential in a nascent, volatile metagame. Scanning through the 50 or so teams I logged, the strongest semi Trick Room teams I faced all revolved around supporting a slow and bulky Groudon or Kyogre with Cresselia, in tandem with Mega Kangaskhan and a faster restricted Pokémon, like Xerneas, Yveltal or Rayquaza. With this in mind, using as a template an old Kyogre/Rayquaza team I had brought to a casual, unofficial VGC’10-esque event held during the community’s TRVG days at SMU, I hastily put together this team, which would net me my second Premier Challenge win.

The Team

Rayquaza

Riot (Rayquaza) @ Life Orb
Ability: Air Lock
EVs: 6 HP / 252 Atk / 252 Spe
Jolly Nature
– Dragon Ascent
– Overheat
– Extreme Speed
– Protect

Emerald was my first ever Pokémon game, so Rayquaza holds a special place in my heart and thus was the restricted Pokémon I immediately flocked to. In the team’s first incarnation I used a Focus Sash Rayquaza, but found its power lacking, missing out on the chance to OHKO 4HP Xerneas, leading me to start the ’16 season with Life Orb Rayquaza instead. The set itself is simple, and should need no explanation to seasoned VGC’16 players by now: Dragon Ascent’s raw damage output is the very reason to use Rayquaza, Extreme Speed for its excellent general utility as a priority move, Overheat to hit Mawile and Ferrothorn – both Pokémon I foresaw giving Kyogre problems, and Protect because avoiding damage for a turn in such a fast-paced format can be game-changing with good prediction, particularly on a Pokémon as field-dominating as Rayquaza.

The EV spread is simple but efficient, which you’ll soon begin to notice is a very typical preference of mine (after all, the team archetype’s simplicity accounts for most of my attraction towards it). The Life Orb gives Jolly Rayquaza enough power to take out typical Xerneas, Kyogre, Mawile and Ferrothorn variants and heavily pressure just about everything else, much like how Mega Salamence played in ’15.

Kyogre

Skyline (Kyogre) @ Blue Orb
Ability: Drizzle
EVs: 252 HP / 252 SpA / 6 SpD
Quiet Nature
IVs: 0 Spe
– Origin Pulse
– Ice Beam
– Sheer Cold
– Protect

Kyogre is another favourite Pokémon of mine, and unquestionably the most adorkable member of the overpowered-as-heck Hoenn weather trio, cementing its spot on the team as my second restricted Pokémon. On a more serious note, I also liked its positive matchup against the big threats like Xerneas, Groudon and Rayquaza, when supported properly by Cresselia.

Another big reason I chose Kyogre over Groudon was how I found Heavy Rain easier to play with than Strong Sunlight. Kyogre matches up well against Groudon both under Heavy Rain, Delta Stream and neutral weather, conditions which can be ensured through ability suppression (Worry Seed/Gastro Acid), Skill Swap, Role Play or having a Rayquaza on the field. Groudon, on the other hand, only matches positively against Kyogre when Strong Sunlight is active, necessitating Role Play or Skill Swap support to win a Primal face-off barring hax with Precipice Blades, which is more likely to work against you anyway, from experience. In fact, even Precipice Blades is a non-issue under ideal circumstances, since when Trick Room is up, Cresselia is able to Skill Swap Levitate onto Kyogre before Groudon can move, allowing it to wall standard Groudon sets, while Groudon has no viable means of acquiring an ability granting it a water immunity.

The set you see above is a complete mess, reminiscent of how the McMuffin I consumed while finalising it looked. Scroll down further for a properly thought out Kyogre set. Sheer Cold was chosen to give me a last-ditch out in desperate situations against Xerneas and Groudon in the numerous unfavourable situations I could find myself in, but never saw use at all the whole tournament.

Cresselia

Olivia (Cresselia) (F) @ Mental Herb
Ability: Levitate
Sassy Nature
IVs: 0 Spe
– Ice Beam
– Trick Room
– Helping Hand
– Skill Swap

Cresselia’s a classic VGC staple, and another favourite Pokémon of mine, both for the soothing cocktail of all the right curves and colours she offers aesthetically, and the multitude of excellent support options she provides every team archetype with. The EV spread I’ve brought to all events this year thus far is a mystery even to myself, but is almost certainly an sub-optimal carry-over from VGC’15, and achieves squat in this new format.

As for the set, Trick Room is an obvious necessity to support Kyogre, and Helping Hand appears since Cresselia is much better off boosting its partners’ attacks than attempting to attack itself in this format full of hard-hitters. Ice Beam felt like the best offensive option then, being able to hit Salamence, Rayquaza and Landorus hard whilst creating a chance of sealing matches with timely freezes, though Grass Knot also appears viable now for a better matchup against Groudon and Kyogre. Mental Herb is the item of choice, since during this team’s construction the idea that Cresselia could be neutered completely through Taunt seemed a common assumption, and it made Cresselia much less of a deadweight against encore users like Liepard and Whimsicott.

The support Skill Swap provides for Kyogre was absolutely essential to this team’s success, providing an almost failsafe matchup against opposing Groudons through maintaining optimal weather conditions and gifting Kyogre Levitate. Of course Skill Swap saw plenty of other utility, such as stealing Parental Bond from Kangaskhan and even Iron Barbs from Ferrothorn.

Kangaskhan

Esther (Kangaskhan) (F) @ Kangaskhanite
Ability: Scrappy
EVs: 6 HP / 252 Atk / 252 Spe
Jolly Nature
– Fake Out
– Double-Edge
– Sucker Punch
– Helping Hand

Kangaskhan itself needs no introduction, but the set above, heavily influenced by Melvin’s ’15 shenanigans probably does.

Scrappy was chosen over Inner Focus, despite the latter sounding better in theory, because of how commonplace and expected the latter had become, leading most players to shy away from every using Fake Out on my own Kangaskhan. This made me confident enough to ditch Inner Focus and run Scrappy instead, to improve my matchup against Whimsicott/Gengar leads which had skyrocketed to stardom on Showdown around the time. Granted, this decision was in part the result of my laziness, since I had no Jolly Inner Focus Kangaskhan standby, but I never found myself missing Inner Focus during the event and managed to take Jonas’s Gengar by surprise in a Top 8 match sealing off the set for me.

And of course, the most baffling trick on this team, Helping Hand in the fourth slot. Early on in the format I noted Low Kick’s apparent irrelevance in theory, hitting only Dialga out of all the restricted mons harder than Double-Edge and Return/Frustration. Kangaskhan also felt a lot more disposable than in previous formats, particularly on a team like mine, which relied on it more for field control through Fake Out support than for raw power, so Power-up-Punch didn’t feel worth the slot. Not it’ll be winning the arms race with Xerneas anyway. Helping Hand stood out the most, out of all the remaining options, allowing me to play Kangaskhan as a highly-disposable Fake Out/Helping Hand supporter alongside Rayquaza, and catch opponents off-guard by boosting Ferrothorn and Kyogre’s attacks under Trick Room. It ensures that Rayquaza is almost always able to take out Xerneas with Dragon Ascent, which came into play in my Finals match against Reuven’s bulky Xerneas EVed to take LO Dragon Ascent. Plus it makes the otherwise speedy Kangaskhan more relevant under TR, as Jolly and maximum speed investment felt like a necessity to take on opposing Xerneas/Kangaskhan leads more effectively.

I understand that more optimal spreads for 252 Spe Kangaskhan exist out there, but eh, like I said, McDonalds, nomnomnom.

Ferrothorn

Lady Gaga (Ferrothorn) @ Sitrus Berry
Ability: Iron Barbs
EVs: 252 HP / 252 Atk / 6 SpD
Brave Nature
IVs: 0 Spe
– Power Whip
– Gyro Ball
– Worry Seed
– Protect

Just another Ferrothorn here, on the team to partner with Kyogre and help against Xerneas and opposing Kyogre, and Groudon, in this case. It’s got a simple 252 HP and 252 Attack spread to maximise bulk and my odds of OHKOing opposing Kyogre, instead of the more hip, but in my opinion, irrelevant, spreads dropping offensive pressure for more bulk.

Worry over Leech in the third slot here to support Kyogre, allowing me to suppress Delta Stream and Desolate Land to punish opposing Rayquaza and Groudon hard with Ice Beam and Origin Pulse respectively. It caught many players by surprise, with most of them expecting a Rayquaza switch in to produce the same effect, causing them to target Ferrothorn with silly moves like Bullet Punch or Gyro Ball and take recoil damage from Iron Barbs.

Sitrus Berry was an ingenious (if I may say so myself, hehe) tech to overcome the enormous amounts of damage Ferrothorn took from Rain-boosted Water Spouts from Kyogre, and Precipice Blades from Groudon. It gave Ferrothorn significantly more survivability and felt more relevant than any other items I tested on it, since Leech Seed was absent on this set, and Burns are a rare sight with Groudon dominating the format. The calculations below speak for themselves:

252+ SpA Primal Kyogre Water Spout (150 BP) vs. 252 HP / 0 SpD Ferrothorn in Heavy Rain: 89-105 (49.1 – 58%) — 10.5% chance to 2HKO after Sitrus Berry recovery

252+ SpA Primal Kyogre Water Spout (150 BP) vs. 252 HP / 0 SpD Ferrothorn in Heavy Rain: 89-105 (49.1 – 58%) — 97.7% chance to 2HKO

252+ Atk Primal Groudon Precipice Blades vs. 252 HP / 0 Def Ferrothorn: 85-102 (46.9 – 56.3%) — 16.8% chance to 2HKO after Sitrus Berry recovery

252+ Atk Primal Groudon Precipice Blades vs. 252 HP / 0 Def Ferrothorn: 85-102 (46.9 – 56.3%) — 80.9% chance to 2HKO

Amoonguss

Angel (Amoonguss) @ Chesto Berry
Ability: Regenerator
EVs: 252 HP / 252 Def / 6 SpD
Relaxed Nature
IVs: 0 Spe
– Spore
– Rage Powder
– Grass Knot
– Worry Seed

Amoonguss perfectly personifies the laziness of this entire team, with its uninspired EV spread and silly fourth moveslot. I somehow ended up teaching it Worry Seed before the tournament instead of Gastro Acid, even though I was well aware of the latter’s presence in Amoonguss’ learnset. Thankfully I never ended up in a position to regret it. The mushroom was meant to act as a substitute to Ferrothorn, providing Ability suppression and redirection to support Kyogre sweeps, against teams lacking Rayquaza and Xerneas. It matched up great against Dual Primal teams, particularly, since it could dent Groudon and Kyogre heavily with Grass Knot. Chesto Berry was meant to help against Smeargle somewhat, by taking the Dark Void and retaliating with Spore, I think?

Amoonguss may not be as irrelevant as I had initially predicted in my previous article, for it to warrant an appearance on my team, but it certainly felt the most irrelevant out of the six on this list. I would only bring it into one of my games during Swiss, and it used nothing other than Grass Knot that match, cleaning up end-game – something Cresselia would likely have done just fine that match.

Part II: Regionals

Despite the team’s successful run, it was clear to me that changes had to be made. I wasn’t fond of my matchup against Whimsicott/Gengar leads which required me to make risky reads like going for Fake Out T1 with Kangaskhan, or my matchup against Smeargle teams in general – since as Reuven and I discovered after our match in the Finals, had his Scarfed Smeargle ran 252 Def in place of 252 HP, it would have been able to comfortably survive LO Rayquaza’s Extreme Speed and cause the game to play out less favourably for me.

A discussion over dinner led me to revive an old idea I had tested early in the season, pairing Rayquaza with Weavile. Weavile’s speedy Fake Out and access to Feint made it an excellent complement to Rayquaza’s already overwhelming offensive pressure. Feint would prove particularly useful in dealing with opposing Smeargles with Focus Sash, allowing me to break through Spiky Shield and double target it for the KO. Feint also helps deal with the Talonflame/Scarf Smeargle combination I faced in the PC’s Finals when playing Reuven, allowing me to hammer Smeargle with Extreme Speed without fearing Quick Guard from Talonflame. Weavile’s STAB options both fit well with my team too, with Icicle Crash helping handle the potentially problematic Crobat, Salamence and opposing Rayquaza, while Knock Off gave me additional options against Xerneas, which is always a plus point in this format.

Wicked (Weavile) @ Focus Sash
Ability: Pickpocket
EVs: 6 HP / 252 Atk / 252 Spe
Jolly Nature
– Fake Out
– Knock Off
– Icicle Crash
– Feint

The set is self-explanatory: A Pokemon as fast and frail as Weavile gets no mileage out of running gimmicky spreads compromising Speed and Attack for ‘bulk’, and the four moves chosen are, in my opinion, what Weavile absolutely needs to be relevant in the format, and certainly what it needs to be relevant to the team.

Kyogre’s moveset also desperately demanded a revamp. Though initially I questioned the utility of Water Spout on a slow, bulky Kyogre, through the course of the tournament I found myself attacking primarily from Full HP, and running into situations where an Origin Pulse miss would be impossible to recover from. Sheer Cold had also proven underwhelming, with occasions necessitating the all-or-nothing out it provided being few and far between.

Skyline (Kyogre) @ Blue Orb
Ability: Drizzle
EVs: 252 HP / 252 SpA / 6 SpD
Quiet Nature
IVs: 0 Spe
– Water Spout
– Scald
– Ice Beam
– Protect

At the end of the day, after some proper testing, I settled for the above set. Water Spout’s greater accuracy proved more valuable than the supposed ‘consistency’ of Origin Pulse’s damage output, and in many situations, I found Water Spout perfectly relevant even when Kyogre wasn’t attacking from full health. Scald was chosen in the third slot primarily due to the threat posed by Wide Guard users, which Kyogre would struggle to break otherwise. The 30% burn chance came into play more often than I had anticipated too, allowing me to win the frequent Kyogre mirror matches and even take down boosted Xerneas I would have no means of breaking otherwise, with a bit of luck.

I didn’t give too much thought to Kyogre’s EV spread then, but on hindsight, looking towards a physically bulkier spread to better take attacks from Kangaskhan, Salamence and Rayquaza seems worth investigating.

[Author’s note: I think I deserve some credit for keeping a Water Spout abusing Pokemon’s nickname family friendly this time…]

At this point I commenced intensive testing on Showdown, hoping to polish up the team as much as possible before Regionals. During this period I coincidentally bumped into fellow combat medic Ryan Chiam on Showdown using an almost identical team, in a rather silly encounter. (Both Ryan and I had no idea we were talking to each other, behind the veils our Showdown usernames provided, until I revealed myself to have won a PC in Singapore) At this point I’d like to focus on Ryan’s own thought processes which lead him to construct an essentially identical team core, before further detailing our road to Regionals.

whenrymetisaac

Author’s note: Quotations from Ryan are highlighted in Red.

“My first VGC’16 team, which I brought to the PC that Isaac won, was inspired by this report. That particular team ran Xerneas / Kyogre / Salamence / Weavile / Mawile / Cresselia. Upon reflection, I made a few changes, and ended up with this:

I ended up switching Mawile to Ferrothorn, since I wasn’t comfortable running a dual-Mega team, a change I did not regret as it gives me a much better answer to opposing Kyogre, especially under TR. The general gameplan with this team is to lead Xerneas next to one of Salamence/Weavile to get an early Geomancy up and punch holes in my opponent’s team. Cresselia + slow Kyogre gave me a TR mode to clean up late game with HH Water Spout.

I don’t think I was able to use Xerneas optimally, without Follow Me support it was hard to get Geomancy up safely. I did however, seem to feel comfortable with the Weavile + Salamence lead as well as the TR clean up mode, which I then used as the starting point for my next team. Above all, I wanted a reliable early game nuke that would give me an easier time cleaning up in the late game once threats had been sufficiently weakened or removed.

After being inspired by Isaac’s team during the PC and consulting Matthew Hui and Justin Lok, I decided to give the Weavile + Rayquaza combo a try. I found the two very deadly together, and really love the early game nuke it gave me. From there, I never looked back.

Kangaskhan served as a secondary mega if I didn’t want to lead with Weavile-Ray. Fake Out from Weavile combined with Power-Up Punch from Kangaskhan sounded like a pretty good idea at the time.”

Through our discussions, Ryan and I both noted the biggest issue with running teams heavily reliant on Kyogre late-game clean-ups under Trick Room – Ferrothorn (and to a lesser extent, Mawile). This was a big problem as the slow, bulky Steel-types have proven more powerful and popular than ever this season, as the most reliable means of taking Xerneas on 1v1.

Ryan and I brainstormed multiple solutions to the issue – mostly involving adjustments to the team’s Kangaskhan/Salamence slot, which we both agreed felt the most disposable.

  • Mega Salamence seemed like a decent option, with access to Flamethrower and good synergy with Weavile as Ryan had noted. Its main flaw was the uselessness of regular Salamence, relegating it to the bench in games where Rayquaza felt necessary – which was just about every match at this point.
  • Talonflame became our next suspect, since it had Gale Wings to circumvent the team’s valued Trick Room, could actually be brought to battles with Rayquaza and not prove totally useless, and benefit from Delta Stream. Its options against Smeargle+Xerneas leads also sounded excellent on paper, with its usual priority Brave Bird/Tailwind and Quick Guard. In testing though, it proved underwhelming, for reasons which still elude me now. Somehow it never felt worth bringing into matches, even when staring down opposing Ferrothorn in team preview.

The last idea we conceived to overcome our thorny issue was to substitute Kyogre with Groudon. Cresselia/Groudon was after all a tried and tested combination, with Groudon benefiting from our Cresselia set’s support the same way Kyogre did, and would improve our Xerneas matchup further – never a bad thing. I was initially apprehensive, and after going 4-6 with the revamped team due to a combination of Precipice Blade misses and unfamiliarity with Groudon, reverted back to Kyogre, which I felt more comfortable with. Ryan however liked the change, defected to Team Magma and was set to bring Groudon to Regionals.

My final solution was to slot Fire Punch on Kangaskhan. I feared that the gimmicky Helping Hand play would no longer carry me the way it had earlier in the format, after noting the popularity of my Finals match’s recording with the Thais on Facebook. I didn’t have the time to test it extensively before Regionals, but having an additional, less obvious out against Ferrothorn was reassuring enough.

Below you’ll find Ryan’s own commentary on his switch to Groudon, and the teams we brought to Regionals:

“I decided to make the switch to Groudon. Cresselia + Groudon also have better synergy than Cresselia + Kyogre since Levitate benefits Groudon more, punishing opposing Groudon which do not have Skill Swap support on their side of the field. The Weavile-Ray lead gave me early game pressure, while Groudon/Ferro/Cress have me my late game clean-up option, forming the core of my new team.

Of course I recognise that this team is still weak to certain things, but I feel that the change to Groudon gave me a better match-up against what I felt was the meta’s number one pick: Xerneas.”

Isaac’s final team

Kyogre

Skyline (Kyogre) @ Blue Orb
Ability: Drizzle
EVs: 252 HP / 252 SpA / 6 SpD
Quiet Nature
IVs: 0 Spe
– Water Spout
– Scald
– Ice Beam
– Protect

Rayquaza

Riot (Rayquaza) @ Life Orb
Ability: Air Lock
EVs: 6 HP / 252 Atk / 252 Spe
Jolly Nature
– Dragon Ascent
– Overheat
– Extreme Speed
– Protect

Cresselia

Olivia (Cresselia) (F) @ Mental Herb
Ability: Levitate
EVs: Still unknown, sub-optimal and subsequently irrelevant
Sassy Nature
IVs: 0 Spe
– Ice Beam
– Trick Room
– Helping Hand
– Skill Swap

Weavile

Wicked (Weavile) @ Focus Sash
Ability: Pickpocket
EVs: 6 HP / 252 Atk / 252 Spe
Jolly Nature
– Fake Out
– Knock Off
– Icicle Crash
– Feint

The only Weavile I had in my PC had Pickpocket, while the one Ryan used ran Pressure. While both abilities have their merits, I’d personally pick Pressure now, for its ability to scout for a rogue Choice Scarf. Pickpocket has yet to trigger at the relevant moment for me thus far, and has even taken Weavile out prematurely, by stealing Life Orbs at 1HP. [Editor’s Note: Ryan discovered Feint was an egg move the night before Regionals and had to borrow Weavile, so I don’t think he thought too much about the ability choice]

Ferrothorn

Lady Gaga (Ferrothorn) @ Sitrus Berry
Ability: Iron Barbs
EVs: 252 HP / 252 Atk / 6 SpD
Brave Nature
IVs: 0 Spe
– Power Whip
– Gyro Ball
– Worry Seed
– Protect

Kangaskhan

Esther (Kangaskhan) (F) @ Kangaskhanite
Ability: Inner Focus
EVs: 252 HP / 252 Atk / 6 Spe
Adaman Nature
– Fake Out
– Double-Edge
– Sucker Punch
– Fire Punch

Dropping Kangaskhan’s speed and switching to Inner Focus was a last minute decision, and didn’t have much thought behind it. I just found Kangaskhan becoming mostly irrelevant in testing, now that Weavile paired better with Rayquaza, and thought making it slower would improve its utility on the team’s hard Trick Room mode. The speed never made a difference during Regionals, and I have no idea if the power did, so it’s hard to say if this swap was worthwhile.

I actually ended up regretting the switch to Fire Punch, because of the additional options it gave me, and sub-optimal plays I found myself making against Ferrothorn as a result. Might have cost me my swiss match against Ryan Chiam, in fact. I do feel I should have stuck with my Jolly Helping Hand set, and that is what I’ll be rolling with should I return to using this team in the future.

Ryan’s final team

Groudon

Groudon @ Red Orb
Ability: Drought
EVs: 252 HP / 252 Atk / 6 SpD
Brave Nature
IVs: 0 Spe
– Precipice Blades
– Fire Punch
– Dragon Claw
– Protect

Rayquaza

Rayquaza @ Life Orb
Ability: Air Lock
EVs: 6 HP / 252 Atk / 252 Spe
Jolly Nature
– Dragon Ascent
– Waterfall
– Extreme Speed
– Protect

Ryan’s Rayquaza runs Waterfall, while mine runs Overheat. Done to improve Ryan’s matchup with opposing Groudon, and in my opinion an excellent decision, since Overheat has little relevance on a team with Groudon to handle Ferrothorn/Mawile.

Cresselia

Cresselia (F) @ Mental Herb
Ability: Levitate
EVs: 212 HP / 140 Def / 156 SpD
Sassy Nature
IVs: 0 Spe
– Ice Beam
– Trick Room
– Helping Hand
– Skill Swap

Look here for a relevant Cresselia spread.

Weavile

Weavile @ Focus Sash
Ability: Pickpocket
EVs: 6 HP / 252 Atk / 252 Spe
Jolly Nature
– Fake Out
– Knock Off
– Icicle Crash
– Feint

Ferrothorn

Ferrothorn @ Leftovers
Ability: Iron Barbs
EVs: 252 HP / 252 Atk / 6 SpD
Brave Nature
IVs: 0 Spe
– Power Whip
– Gyro Ball
– Thunder Wave
– Protect

Ryan’s Ferrothorn runs Leftovers and Thunder Wave, while mine holds a Sitrus Berry and carries Worry Seed. Not a big fan of Leftovers myself, but Ryan did prove its worth in his Swiss match against Vishal, where it gave him better odds of weaselling his way out of a game he ended up choking than Sitrus would have. I also don’t particularly see merit in Thunder Wave, but as mentioned earlier, ability suppression is a lot less relevant to teams built around Groudon than those featuring Kyogre, so it might provide better general utility. Ryan never found himself selecting it though.

Kangaskhan

Kangaskhan (F) @ Kangaskhanite
Ability: Inner Focus
EVs: 6 HP / 252 Atk / 252 Spe
Jolly Nature
– Fake Out
– Double-Edge
– Sucker Punch
– Power-Up Punch

Ryan’s Kangaskhan is fast and runs Power-Up Punch. He notes that Kangaskhan was often played disposably and infrequently, and never ever had opportunities to boost, making it about as relevant as Fire Punch was on mine.

Videos

Do take some time to check out the footage below, showcasing the strengths of the Weavile/Rayquaza combination and demonstrating how it’s used.

Closing thoughts

Ryan now sits comfortably above 200CP from his 2nd place finish at Singapore Regionals, while I’m hanging out slightly below the threshold after only making top 32, looking towards a good finish at any and all future events offering Mid-Season Showdown and above tier pay-outs. Hopefully this article has been an enlightening and beneficial read, and we hope to see you at an event soon!

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We would also like to extend our thanks to:

  • Isaac Lam: The usual squad for all our theoretical discussions, and of course the glorious multi-battles and banter which make my involvement in the Pokemon scene worthwhile. Special shout-out to Nelson for generously granting me such a huge lead in our race to Worlds.
  • Ryan Chiam: Matthew Hui, Justin Lok, Reuven Tan and Nicholas Ng for helping and advising me on my last minute team changes. [Author’s note: Ryan initially misspelled Nicholas’ name… Nick take note, he doesn’t actually love you]

 

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